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Posts tagged ‘advertising’

FSBO Ad Is Racist? Or Just A Big Misunderstanding? [VIDEO]

A little levity for your Thursday. Below is a video from Australia (if you’re reading this via e-mail subscription you’ll have to click through to the post).

You couldn’t have written this better for a sitcom. Just goes to show that life is stranger than fiction! Thanks to Matt Collinge, Vancouver REALTOR® for the link.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bell’s -er Campaign Might Be Confusing, But At Least It’s Grammatically Correct

Since I wrote about Bell’s confusing -er infused advertising campaign, it’s become one of the most searched-for, read, and commented-on posts I’ve ever done. I guess I wasn’t alone in my confusion or annoyance with that campaign.

I have to wonder, however, if the same outfit that drummed up that campaign is involved with US wireless carrier T-Mobile‘s new Google Android powered phone, the G1 [warning: link has music].

I had to laugh at this one, as the concept has been taken one step further by abusing the already-beleaguered English language by proclaiming that the G1 is “The Only Phone That Makes You Smarterer.”

Yes. Smarterer. See for yourself:

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bell’s New “ER” Ad Campaign is Confusing

A Slimmer, Trimmer Ma Bell

A Slimmer, Trimmer Ma Bell

Telecommunications giant Bell has recently ditched their two spokesbeavers, Gordon and Frank, in lieu of a slick new advertising campaign where everything is better. Their logo has been stripped down to just the Bell name in a slim blue typeface, and now every ad you see for them with any word containing the letters ‘er’ has the pair of letters in blue, making them stick out:

From Bell.ca

From Bell.ca

From Bell.ca

From Bell.ca

Since I saw the ads during the Olympics, I’ve been mystified as to what exactly the emphasized “er” was all about. I Googled around a bit and managed to snuff out that it’s all about being easier, better, faster, and so on, but they don’t stick to that theme in their ads. They just throw in the blue ‘er’ whenever they please. It doesn’t make any sense to me. I even Twittered about it and was beginning to wonder if I was the only one who was confused. Then I logged into my facebook page this afternoon and saw this:

Should Bell Bring Back The Beavers?

Should Bell Bring Back The Beavers?

Bell seems to be testing the waters on this issue. Not surprisingly, most people polled said they didn’t care, but taking those out of the equation, a good proportion just don’t get the ads.

And to think, some ad agency probably got millions to dream up that campaign.

What do you think?

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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You can bookmark this post using the button below,
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Truth In Advertising

As REALTORS®, we are tasked with both the sales and marketing aspects of moving properties. Members of the public at large are protected by legislation and professional ethics codes designed to keep our advertising truthful and accurate. We are not allowed to misrepresent a property we have listed for sale.

I was reading the Ubertor Blog this morning, and Steve had posted about agents using Photoshop software to clean up and edit an image used in marketing a property. It is one thing to adjust lighting levels or “airbrush” out a cat or dirty laundry that was inadvertently captured in a frame. It is another altogether to remove power lines from a view shot, add a tree, or change the colour of a house. I think we can all agree this would run afoul of REALTOR® ethics codes and consumer protection legislation.

How much is too much? I regularly touch up my photos. I increase brightness, colour saturation, and I will often edit out items that shouldn’t be there, such as Fido or a vacuum cleaner left in the shot. I would never grossly misrepresent a property, however.

What about this ad I found on digg.com?

Miracle Cream! Would people actually believe this miracle cream works so well as to turn a dried out raisin into a bunch of fresh ripe grapes? Better be careful with this one… use too much and you’ll degenerate back into a fetus.

Tim Ayres


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What's in a URL? Domain Names for Dummies

Everyone in real estate has a website these days. Or at least, they should. In today’s world, they are crucial prospecting and marketing tools for both existing customers and potential new clients. But why waste all your time and/or money in designing a beautiful, content-rich site when no one will remember it? Because our business is done in the real world, it is crucial that we have a memorable URL (domain name, website address) that we can advertise prominently on signs, newspaper ads, maybe even your car. I’ve always been a big believer in short, sweet URLs. Ever since I started in real estate, I’ve tracked the traffic sources of my site with Google Analytics. At least 1/3 of my visitors and usually more enter the URL directly into their browser.So, what’s the difference between good and bad? I came across this blog, written by a fellow geek that, like its title suggests, points out good from bad and explains why. Here is an excerpt of some tips from the site:

Do’s
1. CapitalizeTheFirstLetterOfEachWord.
2.UseDifferentColorsOrBoldToHelpEachWordStandOut.
3. Whenever possible, use YourBrandName.com.
4. If .com is not available, use YourBrandName.net.
5. If .com and .net are taken, find a new brand name. Seriously.
6. Use YourSlogan.com when running an integrated media campaign.
7. Use subdomains when driving people deeper than your homepage – e.g. Product.YourBrandName.com.

Don’ts
1. Don’t include www. We know to go to the World Wide Web to find you.
2. Don’t include http://. If your audience isn’t web savvy enough to know where to type the URL, you shouldn’t have a website.
3. don’tusealllowercase (canyoureallytellwhereonewordendsandthenextbegins?)
4. DITTOFORALLUPPERCASE
5. No-hyphens/or slashes.
6. Don’t use acronyms, abbreviations, or numbers unless your brand is widely known as such.
7. Don’t bury your URL at the bottom of a billboard. I’m the only nerd driving around with a 4x zoom lens to find URLs.

I agree with most of the above, although I should note that if your country (including ours) has a strong and well-recognized top-level domain (for example .ca, .co.uk, or .au) don’t be afraid to use it. You may find your desired brand name under a different TLD. This has the added bonus of distinguishing for search engines like Google where your website/brand/product is located geographically – a pretty good idea for real estate, wouldn’t you agree?

The author is also fond of capitalizing the first letter of multi-word domains. I would tend to agree with this in most cases, and in fact I’ve changed the lettering in my e-mail signatures and will propagate the changes across all my marketing material in the future.

I’d have to say that my personal most-hated URL no-no would have to be excessively long ones. You have 255 characters to work with, but there’s no need to use them all. I even hesitated before purchasing this domain name. Think about it – are you likely to remember VictoriasNumberOneAgentForHousesAndCondosInSookeOrVictoria.com when you drive past the bus bench or see it on a sign?

Also, are you giving up visitors to your site because they’re misspelling it, or getting the wrong top-level domain? Domain names are cheap ($10-20/year) so why not register several, and point them all to the same place? For example, I own TimAyres.ca, TimAyres.com, SellingSooke.com, SellingSooke.ca, and 2 or 3 others that all point to the same place. I’ve even considered TimAyers.ca as an alternative, because it’s a common misspelling of my last name.

Another tip I’d like to add: if you’ve got a great idea for a slick new domain name, run it by a few people first to see if they get it. Ideally somebody not involved in your industry. While agents might get FixturesAndChattels.com, a consumer might not. Worse, your domain name could be unintentionally hilarious, such as a certain online writing utensil retailer, penisland.com – another argument for captializing the first letter of each word in the URL.

So take a moment or two, and examine your domain name. Is it good or bad? And in your printed ads? What can you do to make this extremely important part of your business work better for you?

-Tim

What’s in a URL? Domain Names for Dummies

Everyone in real estate has a website these days. Or at least, they should. In today’s world, they are crucial prospecting and marketing tools for both existing customers and potential new clients. But why waste all your time and/or money in designing a beautiful, content-rich site when no one will remember it? Because our business is done in the real world, it is crucial that we have a memorable URL (domain name, website address) that we can advertise prominently on signs, newspaper ads, maybe even your car. I’ve always been a big believer in short, sweet URLs. Ever since I started in real estate, I’ve tracked the traffic sources of my site with Google Analytics. At least 1/3 of my visitors and usually more enter the URL directly into their browser.So, what’s the difference between good and bad? I came across this blog, written by a fellow geek that, like its title suggests, points out good from bad and explains why. Here is an excerpt of some tips from the site:

Do’s
1. CapitalizeTheFirstLetterOfEachWord.
2.UseDifferentColorsOrBoldToHelpEachWordStandOut.
3. Whenever possible, use YourBrandName.com.
4. If .com is not available, use YourBrandName.net.
5. If .com and .net are taken, find a new brand name. Seriously.
6. Use YourSlogan.com when running an integrated media campaign.
7. Use subdomains when driving people deeper than your homepage – e.g. Product.YourBrandName.com.

Don’ts
1. Don’t include www. We know to go to the World Wide Web to find you.
2. Don’t include http://. If your audience isn’t web savvy enough to know where to type the URL, you shouldn’t have a website.
3. don’tusealllowercase (canyoureallytellwhereonewordendsandthenextbegins?)
4. DITTOFORALLUPPERCASE
5. No-hyphens/or slashes.
6. Don’t use acronyms, abbreviations, or numbers unless your brand is widely known as such.
7. Don’t bury your URL at the bottom of a billboard. I’m the only nerd driving around with a 4x zoom lens to find URLs.

I agree with most of the above, although I should note that if your country (including ours) has a strong and well-recognized top-level domain (for example .ca, .co.uk, or .au) don’t be afraid to use it. You may find your desired brand name under a different TLD. This has the added bonus of distinguishing for search engines like Google where your website/brand/product is located geographically – a pretty good idea for real estate, wouldn’t you agree?

The author is also fond of capitalizing the first letter of multi-word domains. I would tend to agree with this in most cases, and in fact I’ve changed the lettering in my e-mail signatures and will propagate the changes across all my marketing material in the future.

I’d have to say that my personal most-hated URL no-no would have to be excessively long ones. You have 255 characters to work with, but there’s no need to use them all. I even hesitated before purchasing this domain name. Think about it – are you likely to remember VictoriasNumberOneAgentForHousesAndCondosInSookeOrVictoria.com when you drive past the bus bench or see it on a sign?

Also, are you giving up visitors to your site because they’re misspelling it, or getting the wrong top-level domain? Domain names are cheap ($10-20/year) so why not register several, and point them all to the same place? For example, I own TimAyres.ca, TimAyres.com, SellingSooke.com, SellingSooke.ca, and 2 or 3 others that all point to the same place. I’ve even considered TimAyers.ca as an alternative, because it’s a common misspelling of my last name.

Another tip I’d like to add: if you’ve got a great idea for a slick new domain name, run it by a few people first to see if they get it. Ideally somebody not involved in your industry. While agents might get FixturesAndChattels.com, a consumer might not. Worse, your domain name could be unintentionally hilarious, such as a certain online writing utensil retailer, penisland.com – another argument for captializing the first letter of each word in the URL.

So take a moment or two, and examine your domain name. Is it good or bad? And in your printed ads? What can you do to make this extremely important part of your business work better for you?

-Tim

Victoria's Creative Sign Design Is On The Move

Rose Glen of Creative sign design sent out an e-mail today informing us all of the long-anticipated move to their new digs. Rose notes that after 14 years in business at 630 Bay Street, the business is quite literally bursting at the seams of the present location (and has been for some time).

Besides being larger and better-located, Rose’s new shop will have the space to do vehicle lettering inside the shop – making it much more convenient for her clients who until this point have had to wait for a dry day to get the lettering done.

Creative Sign Map

The big move day is October 1st. The new address will be:
#5-416 Garbally Road
Victoria, BC
V8T 2K1

Phone numbers and e-mail will stay the same:
(250) 480-1747 Phone
(250) 480-1726 Fax
creative@islandnet.com

We thank Rose and her staff for all their hard work and dedication to a job well done and customer service over the years, and look forward to being a part of her effort to take the business to new heights.

Links: Creative Sign Design Annuncement (pdf)

Victoria’s Creative Sign Design Is On The Move

Rose Glen of Creative sign design sent out an e-mail today informing us all of the long-anticipated move to their new digs. Rose notes that after 14 years in business at 630 Bay Street, the business is quite literally bursting at the seams of the present location (and has been for some time).

Besides being larger and better-located, Rose’s new shop will have the space to do vehicle lettering inside the shop – making it much more convenient for her clients who until this point have had to wait for a dry day to get the lettering done.

Creative Sign Map

The big move day is October 1st. The new address will be:
#5-416 Garbally Road
Victoria, BC
V8T 2K1

Phone numbers and e-mail will stay the same:
(250) 480-1747 Phone
(250) 480-1726 Fax
creative@islandnet.com

We thank Rose and her staff for all their hard work and dedication to a job well done and customer service over the years, and look forward to being a part of her effort to take the business to new heights.

Links: Creative Sign Design Annuncement (pdf)