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Posts tagged ‘garbage’

Sooke Disposal Garbage Drop-Off Is Closing

While everyone in Sooke has been arguing about the proposed new carwash and laundromat (which I think is a great idea, by the way), something much more serious is going on with a long-time local business. The Sooke Disposal drop-off yard, located between Edward Milne School and Fred Milne park is closing. As of September 30th, Butler Brothers Concrete, which owns the land, is reclaiming it for their own use and Sooke Disposal will have to move off the land. Read more

Garbage and Recycling Collection in Sooke

garbagerecycling

Part of moving to a new community is learning the little things about your new surroundings. When I moved to Sooke from the Vancouver area 3 and a half years ago, I found myself putting out my garbage can on the curb whenever I saw my neighbours doing so. I’d come home from the office and to my dismay, the can was still full and sitting at the curb. I asked a neighbour what was going on and she explained that garbage pick-up is done privately in Sooke and not paid for by your property taxes or utilities like in the Metro Vancouver area.

It turns out that outside of the larger municipalities like Victoria and Saanich, garbage collection in the Capital Regional District is offered on a user-pay basis by a few different companies.

Here in Sooke, we have a couple of choices. Locally-owned and operated Sooke Disposal (250-642-3646) or Alpine Disposal. Both have competitive rates and offer several different options for pick-up. I have opted for Alpine; they pick up one can per week, and it costs me about $50 every three months. Rates vary more or less depending on how much trash you dispose of and how often you’d like it collected.

At first I thought this was a strange arrangement, but as I got to thinking of it more, it makes great sense both economically and environmentally. By paying for the amount of garbage you dispose directly as opposed to a flat rate through your taxes, you are rewarded for reducing the amount of trash you throw out. Because it’s just the two of us here, and we recycle and compost, we don’t have to subsidize large families or wasteful individuals who throw out a lot. One neighbour has managed to get her trash (for a family of four!) down to one average sized can every two weeks, so she saves even more. And, by having several different companies offering their services, homeowners are ensured that rates will be competitive.

The Capital Regional District handles the Blue Box/Bag recycling program through your tax dollars. Pick-up in Sooke is every second Monday, including holidays. Newcomers to Sooke can get their bin and bag for a small fee at Sooke Harbour Motors, right next to my office just past the lights at Otter Point and Sooke Roads. The recycling program is great, in that they take most everything, and you don’t need to rinse cans and bottles or remove labels. About the only thing they don’t take is milk cartons.  A recent Times Colonist article mentioned the fact that collectors have been instructed not to pick up oversized containers, so make sure your bin complies with the CRD guidelines. More information about the CRD recycling program.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Horrible MLS Photo Of The Day #270

November 29th, 2008

Nothing says "home" quite like a dumpster out front.

Nothing says"home" quite like a dumpster out front

This was the only photo on the listing. You don’t have to be Ansel Adams to realize that this shot could have been improved by simply excluding the big green bin from the foreground. The property looks like it needs a bit of cleaning up, but without the bin this listing would increase its saleability tenfold.

See all the usual suspects here.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bear Safety in Sooke and on Vancouver Island

Photo Credit: Bobengr on Flickr

Photo Credit: Bobengr on Flickr

It seems that scarcely a day goes by without some news story about an encounter with humans and bears in British Columbia. Fortunately, injuries are rare, but unfortunately, the animals end up the victims, having to be killed in order to protect the public.

Last month saw the sensational account of a fisherman from Salt Spring Island who was on his boat, cleaning his catch in nearby Port Renfrew, when a black bear swam across the river, climbed into his boat and attacked him. It was only after several bystanders attacked and killed the bear with fishing gaffs and knives that the old, hungry animal relented.

This morning’s Times Colonist featured a story about a man beating to death a bear with a makeshift club after being attacked. Side note: Holy crap, get that guy the Manly-Man Of The Year Award!

As our urban development spreads further into forested and natural areas, these encounters become more common. Since living in Sooke, I’ve come across a couple of bears (from a distance, thankfully).

Here are a few safety tips to consider to keep you, your family, and the bears out of harm’s way:

  • Consider storing your garbage cans and compost behind a fence to make it less tempting for wildlife.
  • Stick to established, well-worn paths with good visibility. This will enable you to spot bears from a distance and you’ll be less likely to surprise one in dense foliage.
  • Make some noise while hiking. Bears rarely want confrontation; most incidents are from surprising an animal.
  • Be careful with food in the bush. Use food caches at Provincial parks, seal your garbage in plastic bags, and store food away from your tent
  • Consider carrying bear spray, but don’t use it as a substitute for smart planning and avoidance techniques.
  • Travel in groups – you’re safer in numbers. Don’t let kids or pets wander.
  • If you come across dead wildlife, leave the area and report it to park staff; carcasses attract bears.

It’s our responsibility to protect bears from becoming food conditioned by being careful with our food supplies and our garbage. Most encounters occur with bears that become used to frequenting an area for an easy source of food. The only solution for a food conditioned bear is to destroy it, hence “A fed bear is a dead bear.”

For more safety tips and bear facts, the BC Parks website has an excellent bear safety page.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Horrible MLS Photo Of The Day #173

August 24th, 2008

From a reader in Vancouver, comes this gem from their MLS®. There is so much wrong here I don’t know where to begin. From the GARBAGE on the counter to the tinfoil on the stove, this is easily one of the worst all year!

See all the usual suspects here.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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