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Posts tagged ‘interest’

Bank Of Canada Raises Interest Rate to 0.5% At June 2010 Meeting

Only one direction to go!

This morning at its June 1, 2010 meeting, the Bank of Canada raised its key overnight lending rate (the rate at which it lends funds to chartered banks) one-quarter per cent (25 basis points) to 0.5%, its first rate hike in almost three years.

What can we expect? Banks will be increasing their prime lending rates. This is the rate upon which variable-rate mortgages are based, as well as other borrowing products such as personal loans, and some credit cards. The quarter-per cent hike translates into about $12 more per $100,000 of borrowed funds.

One thing to consider if you’re going to be renewing your mortgage or taking out a new mortgage when you buy, is that the lender discount from prime rate has been increasing (best I’ve heard is prime -0.6% lately), which may help make up for this first rate hike. Talk to an experienced mortgage broker and see what your options are.

The Bank of Canada’s move to increase rates comes amid a shaky worldwide recovery and only time will tell if more rate hikes will be necessary.

Bottom line: don’t panic. Rates are still historically low and will likely remain so for the foreseeable future. Mortgage rates have been on a generally downward trend for about 30 years.

The full Bank of Canada news release can be found here.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Your Home Is Not An ATM!

Something’s been bugging me for a while now, and I’ve been meaning to write about it. You know the commercials on the radio and TV. I probably hear them half a dozen times a day, more if I’m listening to a Canucks broadcast.

“Making your home equity work for you…..”

“If you own your home,” say the commercials, “we’ll lend you money.”

Sounds great, right? Free money! Against the value of my home! More and more, Canadians’ chief source of wealth these days is the equity built up in their home. Equity is the difference between the market value of the home and the outstanding balance on the mortgage on the property.

Homeowners should approach equity take-outs with extreme caution, because managed improperly, they can cost dearly. Many financial advisers will tell you it makes good financial sense to refinance high-interest debt such as personal loans, lines of credit, and credit card debt with low-interest mortgage money. While this is true, one needs to first examine how the indebtedness happened. If you’ve got $30,000 of student loans at a high interest rate, it makes good financial sense to pay them out with lower interest money. However, if you’ve racked up $30,000 of credit card debt at really high interest rates by consistently spending more than what you make, what is stopping you from doing it again once you’ve paid it out?

The point is: spend within your means. Irresponsible credit use is one of the biggest financial problems in this country, if not the world.

Some people have the mistaken assumption (and perhaps some members of my profession are partially responsible) that real estate prices only go up. We don’t have to look far back in history to bust this myth. If you had purchased a home in Victoria in the spring of 2008, with a 5% down payment, there is a very good chance you owed more on it than it was worth by February or March of 2009. Real estate prices fluctuate, and the worst situation you can be in is to owe more than you could get for your home if you had to sell it.

Treating your home like an ATM is a great way to end up in that situation.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bank Of Canada Cuts Interest Rate to 0.25% At April 2009 Meeting

Snip!

Snip!

To the surprise of many analysts, this morning at its April 21, 2009 meeting, the Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate (the rate at which it lends funds to chartered banks) another half-percent to 0.25%, continuing the trend of historic low rates in an effort to stimulate the economy. Since December 2007, the Bank has trimmed 4.25% off its overnight lending rate, which has had the effect of lowering mortgage rates (especially variable rate mortgages).

Two of Canada’s chartered banks were quick to match the rate cut, trimming prime to 2.25% – a good sign that credit is available and our banks are ready to lend. This should translate into lower variable-rate mortgage products in the coming weeks. If you’re already on a variable-rate mortgage tied to the prime rate, then you’ll get a letter from your financial institution soon, advising you of the change. If you’re lucky enough to have a prime rate -0.85% mortgage, this means that with bank prime being at 2.25%, you’ll be paying a paltry 1.40% on your variable rate mortgage. That’s almost free.

The Bank predicts that fiscal and financial stimulus measures initiated by governments and central banks worldwide have been slower than expected to take hold, and will be holding the 0.25% rate until the end of the second quarter of 2010, barring unforeseen circumstances. All this means that recovery of our economy is going to take longer, starting late next year, with the economy reaching full capacity in 2011.

The full Bank of Canada news release can be found here.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bank Of Canada Cuts Interest Rate to 0.5% At March 2009 Meeting

Scissors

Big scissors for a big job!

UPDATE: CLICK FOR THE APRIL 21st, 2009 INTEREST RATE ANNOUNCEMENT

This morning at its March 3, 2009 meeting, the Bank of Canada cut its key overnight lending rate (the rate at which it lends funds to chartered banks) another half-percent to 0.5%, continuing the trend of historic low rates in an effort to stimulate the economy.

Canada’s big five banks were quick to match the rate cut, trimming prime to 2.5% – a good sign that credit is available and our banks are ready to lend. This should translate into lower variable-rate mortgage products in the coming weeks. If you’re already on a variable-rate mortgage tied to the prime rate, then you’ll get a letter from your financial institution soon, advising you of the change. If you’re lucky enough to have a prime rate -0.85% mortgage, this means that with bank prime being at 2.5%, you’ll be paying a paltry 1.65% on your variable rate mortgage. That’s almost free.

The Bank predicts that fiscal and financial stimulus measures should start to take hold later this year and into next to help the economy recover, and hints that rates will remain at this level or may decrease further until excess supply in the economy is taken up.

The full Bank of Canada news release can be found here.

Tim Ayres – Sooke Real Estate Professional

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Bank Of Canada Holds Fast on Interest Rate – June 10th, 2008

Update: December 9th, 2008 Rate Announcement

The Bank of Canada surprised most economists in this country by this morning declaring that they would Bank Of Canadanot change the key overnight rate from its current 3%. This is the rate that is used to lend funds to financial institutions across the nation, who in turn lend funds to consumers. Typically, when it drops, banks will also decrease their rates for adjustable-rate mortgages. When it increases, consumers will see a rise in their rate.

The Bank cited better-than-expected global economic growth, which has offset the lessening demand for Canadian goods in the United States. Record high commodity prices (hello, $130+ oil!) have helped to push the Bank’s forecast for total CPI (consumer price index) inflation to more than 3% for 2008. The Bank’s goal is to maintain core inflation at 2%. They state in their release that the Canadian economy is operating in a state of excess supply (less demand for our goods, most notably from the U.S.), which should balance out inflation to keep it at 2% this year. The Bank foresees steady economic growth over the next 2 years, and will monitor inflation closely to keep it in check.

My interpretation is that we won’t see another rate cut for awhile. If the Bank feels that inflation is being held in check by global economic conditions, then they probably won’t increase the rate in the near future. This is good news for buyers, and home owners with adjustable-rate mortgages. My monthly payments have decreased by over $100 in the last year with these rate cuts.

Your comments or questions are welcomed and encouraged!
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Tim Ayres


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Bank Of Canada Slashes Key Interest Rate by 0.5%

UPDATE: JUNE 10 INTEREST RATE ANNOUNCEMENT POSTED HERE

April 22nd, 2008

In keeping with its mandate to keep inflation in Canada at the 2% target, the Bank of Canada todayBank Of Canada announced that it was lowering its overnight lending rate by 50 basis points (one-half per cent) to 3%. Citing deepening economic woes in the U.S., tightening credit conditions, and overall instability in the world economy, it’s hoped that this economic stimulus, along with strong domestic demand and high employment, will help keep Canada’s economy performing well.

The Bank forecasts that Canada’s economy will grow by 1.4% this year, 2.4% in 2009, and 3.3% in 2010 when the Bank also projects that inflation will reach the target 2%. The overnight rate has been lowered 150 basis points (1.5%) since December of last year.

The press release hinted that this may be the last of the rate cuts for a while – the timing of any further monetary stimulus will depend on global conditions and their effect on Canadian inflation.

This news is positive to anyone on a variable-rate mortgage, which is tied to the central bank rate. Fixed-rate mortgages are slower to come down, but should fall into line with the rate cut. With more and more choices on the market than in recent years, buyers are in a good position to extend their purchasing power and get into their perfect place.

The Bank’s next meeting to discuss interest rates is June 10, 2008.

Read the full Bank Of Canada press release here.

Tim Ayres


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